Time Travel To The Future: We Do It Almost Every day

First ever photo of super massive black hole
Interesting Information About Black Holes
June 19, 2019
NASA's lunar rover could enable deep-space exploration
Space Exploration: The Many Practical Paybacks Of It
June 22, 2019
Image of Time Travel Machine

Every man, woman or child who has seen the Back to the Future knows that two things were needed for time travel:

  • 1.21 gigawatts
  • a flux capacitor

And well, a stylish sports car to fit it all in. That said, even decades of research have justify us empty-handed. There are no flux capacitors in real life or any other gadget that allows time-travel. But when you consider the question from the point of view of physics, the answer is slightly different.

Apparently, we travel to the future almost all the time. A professor at MIT states that different people can travel to the future at different rates. An example of this is clocks on earth and clocks on satellites. Those on earth tick a tad bit slower due to Einstein’s theories of relativity. There are two, and they say:

  • The special theory states that an object moving faster relative to another experiences time slower. For example, a GPS satellite rotating around the earth at 14,000 kph has clocks that slow by 7 microseconds every day.
  • The general theory states that a clock closer to the centre of gravity tick slightly slower than those further away. It signifies that a GPS satellite orbiting the earth at the height of 20,100 km from the ground have clocks that add 45 microseconds to time every day.

When taken together, those clocks are 38 microseconds faster. Thankfully, GPS technology factors in these phenomena to provide accurate time.

These relative phenomena prove that travelling to the future is possible (or at least in the sense of quantum. What is questionable, even after years of experiment and study, is travelling in the past.  How can one travel to the past? Can one mess around with it? These are still topics of hot debate.how!

Leave a Reply